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M.M.M.M. (16)

Tally Hall remains an eclectic songwriting team because they have four primary songwriters that tend to write their songs on their own and bring them to the band to work on and enhance.  They try to keep a good balance and equal share of songs by each songwriter on their albums.

The writer of each song was consistently written on the back cover of every album/EP until Good & Evil. The Tally Hallmanac is now the best place to find this information. http://www.hiddeninthesand.com/wiki/

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6 + seven =

There seems to be some confusion about this song, at least for fans born after 1990 or for those who aren’t as proactive on the web as they could be and wonder why it wasn’t on their copy of Marvin’s.

“Just A Friend” is an old, quirky rap song done by a guy named Biz Markie.  This was his biggest hit in the 80’s.  I’m sure you’ll have no problem finding a way to listen to the original version.

A live performance of the song was included on The Pingry EP. As for the studio recording,

“A studio recording of “Just A Friend” was made in July ’06 but did not surface until the Atlantic Records releasing of MMMM in April 2008.  Those who attended concerts after the release of the album were given instructions on how to download the track for free.”

Basically, you were given a small business card with a URL and password to download the song for free.

Categories: EPs, M.M.M.M.

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18 + 1 =

Best answer I can come up for this is:  whatever you want it to be!

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nineteen − 5 =

The genius of this song never ends.  But your question has debatable answers depending on your interpretation of a true haiku.

Each verse is just slightly off of the traditional 17 syllable English-written haiku by one or two syllables except the verse in the middle,

“La Da De Diddum
La Da Da Dum Do Diddle
Dum Do La De Do”

which satisfies the definition of a haiku.

Additionally, the verse Joe sings is cleverly written because he’s messing up a rhyme while telling about how he is no good at rhyming:

“I’ve never thought much
Of formulaic verse anyway
And rhymes are not my fort(e)”

Good stuff.  Probably one of the most cleverly written songs I’ve ever known of and surely one of my favorite Tally Hall songs.

Edit:  It’s since been pointed out that “fort” is an acceptable alternative pronunciation of forte.

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1 − 1 =

There’s a ton of slight, little differences throughout, but if you’re looking for significant ones, the fan community list the following:

  1. The intro to Banana Man
  2. The transition of Welcome to Tally Hall into Taken For A Ride
  3. The robot effect on Andrew’s voice in Taken For A Ride
  4. The speed of The Bidding
  5. The intro to Just Apathy
  6. Zubin dies at the end of The Whole World And You
Category: M.M.M.M.

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11 + 4 =

“On booty duty like your name was Eddy Thatch.” is the lyric in question.

When I explain who Eddy (or Eddie) Thatch is, the lyric will finally make sense. Are you ready?

“The true identity of Blackbeard differs between official records, personal accounts, and fictionalized history. Edward Teach or Edward Thatch or Edward Drummond was most likely born in Bristol, England around 1680 (Although some unverifiable reports say he was from Jamaica, London, or Philadelphia). Like many other young men of his time, he probably served aboard a British privateer in the West Indies during the War of the Spanish Succession (Queen Anne’s War) and chose piracy over unemployment at war’s end.”

That’s right!  Eddy Thatch is one of the assumed names of the legendary pirate Blackbeard.

Source: http://www.thepiratesrealm.com/Blackbeard.html

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8 − 7 =

For the record, this method of annotation appears on all track listings for every album.

Contrary to UNpopular belief, the name(s) next to each song indicate who wrote the song.  Up to this point, the way the band typically works is that each songwriter works on their songs individually and then once they’re fairly near completion, they take the songs to the group to iron it all out.

So, he who wrote the lyrics is the same person who wrote the music.  Consequently, this also usually results in the same person being the lead singer of the song.

Category: M.M.M.M.

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fourteen − 4 =

For the first printing, due to a mistake at the printer’s, the Zubin-page in the lyric sheets was colored purple instead of blue. Also, the strip on the side of the CD case had a typographical error, and reads “Marvin’s Marvelous Mechancial Museum” as opposed to “Mechanical”. Both of these errors were fixed for the 2006 re-release.

If your CD case or lyric sheets are a bit out of whack, you’ve got yourself a first printing! More information:  CLICK HERE

Of course, if you have the 2008 re-re-issue of MMMM, then you’ve got a completely updated cover and booklet.  You can tell the differences here: http://www.hiddeninthesand.com/wiki/index.php?title=Marvin%27s_Marvelous_Mechanical_Museum_(Album)

Category: M.M.M.M.

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14 − 8 =

Joe does the voice of Mr. Moon in “Spring And A Storm” but of course, he’s using a vocal effect to lower the pitch of his voice. On a related note, the children who are speaking to Mr. Moon are 2 students of Joe’s teacher-mother.

Category: M.M.M.M.

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three × 2 =

Why, those initials would stand for “What Would Tally Hall Do?” of course!

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7 − 2 =

All the songs on Marvin’s except for Haiku are redone versions of older songs. Here’s the etymology of Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum’s tunes:

Good Day 
Originally on the “Party Boobytrap EP”, then moved to “Complete Demos” unmodified. Apart from the orchestration, there were no major changes when updated for MMMM.

Greener 
Also from “Party Boobytrap EP” and “Complete Demos.” When moved to MMMM, the “tissues get used” verse was removed.

Welcome to Tally Hall 
Originally from the “Welcome to Tally Hall EP” and moved to “Complete Demos.” When moved to MMMM, there were some slight word changes, such as “homophonic” to “heterophonic.” The intro and outro are new, and the opening notes of the song were originally not NES-sounding.  Live versions of Welcome to Tally Hall in the very, very early days had completely different lyrics at the Zubin verse than they do now. The lyrics were redone just before the recording for Complete Demos. The original version listed the band members by name, including Steve Gallagher, who left.

Taken for a Ride 
Originally from the “Pingry EP”. Changes when moved to Marvin’s include synthesizing Andrew’s voice, and including orchestration…the original version was acoustic and done with only vocals and piano.

The Bidding 
Also from Pingry, but not acoustic. This song, like Good Day, changed very little in its transition to MMMM.

Be Born
Originally from Pingry, this track was also acoustic and used only vocals, guitar, and the melodica. There was a minor lyrical change to make the song flow easier about half-way through, however apart from additional orchestration this song experienced little change.

Banana Man 
Uniquely, this song appeared on both “Party Boobytrap EP” and “Welcome to Tally Hall EP” before being moved to “Complete Demos.” A verse which consisted only of whistling was removed, the verse AFTER the whistling was removed, and some minor lyrical changes ocurred in the transfer to Marvin’s, in additional to re-orchestration.

Just Apathy 
Originally from the “Welcome to Tally Hall EP” before moving to “Complete Demos.” In its transition to Marvin’s, a line at the beginning of the song was redone to omit a curse word. Apart from this, lyrics, and even orchestration, were very similar, though the song’s tempo was increased from its noteably slower predacessor.

Spring and a Storm 
Originally an unreleased demo only available by sifting through Google’s cache for one of Tally Hall’s online song depositories. Orchestration, voices at the “Mr. Moon” verse, and the lyrics of that verse were completely changed. The “whether ever a heaven or hell” was changed to “Or wherever you were before you were,” etc.

Two Wuv 
Originally from “Welcome to Tally Hall EP” and moved to “Complete Demos.” The telephone call verse was originally a dialogue explaining the origin of the song. Apart from this, and orchestration, the Marvin’s version differed very little.  The original version didn’t fade out, though.

Haiku
Brand spankin’ new. It’s possible that some Tally Hall insiders knew of it before its release, but no public performance or available recording exists to suggest that, prior to Marvin’s, this song existed anywhere outside Tally Hall’s practice or recording sessions.

The Whole World and You 
The first Tally Hall recording is from “Pingry EP,” though prior to that it was a song composed by Andrew and performed by “Toy Orchestra.” That version of the song is still available for download through Toy Orchestra’s webpage (www.toyorchestra.com). The orchestration was modified, however no noteable lyrical changes ocurred; sotries remain sotries.

Ruler of Everything 
Originally from “Party Boobytrap” and moved to “Complete Demos.” A newer version, modified by Joe, was placed on the internet with few major changes apart from additional sound effects. The Marvin’s version added the “In the gallows” verse and, in turn, removed the “Number your thumb” verse. The orchestration of this song was completely different, and the lead-up by 13 was a convention made specifically for the Marvin’s version.

Hidden in the Sand 
This was a secret track on both “Complete Demos” and MMMM. Its move from “Complete Demos” to MMMM was marked only by additional background sound. No lyrical changes or orchestration changes ocurred.

More information: http://www.atmosphere.be/releases/tally_hall/

Category: M.M.M.M.

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6 + 4 =

Yes, it really is Mary Kate (and/or Ashley) on Two Wuv! It’s actual sound clips gathered up from one (or more than one) of their movies. I don’t know exactly what movie(s), though. Feel free to comment and let me know.

Category: M.M.M.M.

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three × five =

There might have been if Marvin wasn’t asked first.  The band checked with him as soon as they decided that’s what they wanted to call the album.  Not only did he agree to allow them to use the name, but he even let them take apart some of the machines to record the innard sounds as well as just the typical atmospheric jumble of tick-tocks, clink-clanks, plink-plonks, buzzes, whirly-do’s, whistles and bells that you hear when you walk around the Marvelous Museum of Marvin’s.  You’ll hear them throughout the CD.

Category: M.M.M.M.

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14 − eight =

Yes indeed. Located in Farmington Hills, MI (just outside Detroit), Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum is an eclectic arcade with piles upon piles of nostalgia and fun. See more at www.marvins3m.com.

Category: M.M.M.M.

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3 × five =

No, It’s not. There is a long story behind that. It was originally a typo in the Toy Orchestra version, but everyone that had been in that got a laugh about it. So, Andrew decided to keep it that way. Of course, since Joe wasn’t in Toy Orchestra, he said something along the lines of, “Oh. I always just thought it was whenever Ross was telling a story and it got all messed up.”

You can watch for this in the Wall Party ’06 videos, at the end of The Whole World And You. https://youtu.be/qgoXmvICPoI?t=106

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14 + 18 =

There’s a faint little backwards voice at the last few seconds of the disc while the sound of the ocean can be heard.  It’s actually Marvin Yagoda himself saying “Wouldn’t the world be better off if we took nonsense more seriously?”

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9 − 6 =

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